Voting for Democracy in Ghana. The 2004 Elections in Perspective Vol.1

Voting for Democracy in Ghana. The 2004 Elections in Perspective Vol.1

Thematic Studies

Edited by Kwame Boafo-Arthur

Ghana's 2004 elections were another milestone in the country's transition to a mature democracy. The essays in this volume assess various aspects of this transition. The various themes focus on problem areas that impinge directly or indirectly on the performance of the country's democratic institutions and governance. The issues they address include conflict and reconciliation in the light of years of human rights abuses; leadership styles and the degree to which leadership since 1993 has handled various critical problems confronting a new democracy like Ghana; ethnicity and whether or not it is a salient factor in the country's political life; electoral choices and whether Ghanaians vote on the basis of issues, ethnicity or something else; and the degree of institutional development especially of critical democratic institutions. The essays are unanimous in underscoring the tremendous progress Ghana has made in building a democratic society despite the several unresolved problems.

ISBN 9789988771652 | 308 pages | 234 x 156 mm | 2006 | Freedom Publications, Ghana | Paperback

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About the Editor

Kwame Boafo-Arthur

Kwame Boafo-Arthur is currently Head, Department of Political Science, University of Ghana, and Legon. He holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Ghana, Legon and a Master of Arts degree also in Political Science from Carleton University, Ottawa, having obtained his first degree in Political Science from the University of Ghana. He is also a Barrister at Law and Solicitor of the Supreme Court of Ghana. He has been a Visiting Scholar/Fellow at various institutions, notably: Nordic African Institute, Uppsala in Sweden, African Studies Centre, Leiden in the Netherlands, and School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in the UK. He was also a Fulbright Senior African Research Scholar at the James S. Coleman African Studies Centre, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1998. He has published extensively on subjects covering Ghana’s political economy, international economic relations, foreign policy, civil society, the environment, and African development.

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