ISBN 9781779220264
Pages 76
Dimensions 229 x 152 mm
Illustrations B/W Illustrations
Published 2003
Publisher Weaver Press, Zimbabwe
Format Paperback

Tale of Tamari

by Shimmer Chinodya

Tamari is fourteen. Her parents have died and she lives with her brother, Kuda, in their home where the rooms have been let to lodgers. Her Uncle Banda supposedly keeps an eye on them, but is more concerned about how much money he can make from the tenants. The Tale of Tamari is not a sad or didactic story, but one which delights us with its freshness and its empathy, besides giving us a richly varied slice of life in Zimbabwe today as orphans make their way into a future.

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Review

'This book is peopled with vivid characters who bring the story to life in a real world that is peopled by bad characters. Fortunately for the protagonist Tamari, good people do not allow injustices to go unchallenged. The author has rendered all the characters with sympathy.'

Multicultural Review
About the Author

Shimmer Chinodya

Shimmer Chinodya was born in 1957 in Gweru, the second child in a large, happy family. He studied English Literature and Education at the University of Zimbabwe. After a spell teaching and with curriculum development, he earned an MA in Creative Writing at the Iowa Writers' Workshop (USA). His first novel, Dew in the Morning, was published in 1982. This was followed by Farai's Girls (1984), Child of War (under the pen name B. Chirasha, 1986), Harvest of Thorns (1989), Can We Talk and other stories (1998), Tale of Tamari (2004), Chairman of Fools (2005), Strife (2006), Tindo's Quest (2011), Chioniso and other stories (2012) and Harvest of Thorns Classic: A Play (2016). His work appears in numerous anthologies. He has also written educational texts, training manuals, radio and film scripts, including the script for the feature film, Everyone's Child. He has won many awards for his work, including the Commonwealth Writers Prize (Africa Region) for Harvest of Thorns, a Caine Prize shortlist for Can we Talk and the NOMA award for publishing in Africa for Strife. He has won awards on many occasions from ZIWU, ZBPA and NAMA. He has also received many fellowships abroad and from 1995 to 1997 was Distinguished Dana Professor in Creative Writing and African Literature at the University of St Lawrence in upstate New York. 

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