ISBN 9781920033286
ePub ISBN 9781920033330
Pages 138
Dimensions 244 x 170 mm
Published 2018
Publisher NISC (Pty) Ltd, South Africa
Formats Paperback, eBook

Unshared Identity

Posthumous paternity in a contemporary Yoruba community

by Babajide Ololajulo

Unshared Identity employs the practice of posthumous paternity in Ilupeju-Ekiti, a Yoruba-speaking community in Nigeria, to explore endogenous African ways of being and meaning-making that are believed to have declined when the Yoruba and other groups constituting present-day Nigeria were preyed upon by European colonialism and Westernisation. However, the author’s fieldwork for this book uncovered evidence of the resilience of Africa’s endogenous epistemologies.

Drawing on a range of disciplines, from anthropology to literature, the author lays bare the hypocrisy underlying the ways in which dominant Western ideals of being and belonging are globalised or proliferated, while those that are unorthodox or non-Western (Yoruba and African in this case) are pathologised, subordinated and perceived as repugnant.  At a time when the issues of decolonisation and African epistemologies are topical across the African continent, this book is a timely contribution to the potential revival of those values and practices that make Africans African.

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Review

'The overall merit of the study is in the rich empirical content on contemporary practices of posthumous paternity and perceptions and lived experiences of and challenges confronting the resultant offspring among the Yoruba caught betwixt and between the attractions of neoliberal notions of individual autonomy on the one hand and resilient collectivism on the other.'

Professor Francis B Nyamnjoh, Department of Anthropology, University of Cape Town
About the Author

Babajide Ololajulo

Dr Babajide Ololajulo is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria. His research interests cover politics of identity, heritage and memory, and the political economy of oil exploration in Nigeria.  

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